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Linux apt command explained via Practical examples

Linux apt command explained via Practical examples

The apt command is a powerful package manager for the Linux operating system. It allows users to easily find and install software packages from the official repositories or from third-party sources such as PPAs (Personal Package Archives). It also helps users keep their system up to date by automatically downloading and installing the latest versions of packages. 

Here at Fixwebnode, we will explore the various options of the apt command and provide practical examples of its use. 

 

What is apt ?

The apt command stands for Advanced Package Tool, which is a package manager for the Debian Linux distribution and its derivatives, such as Ubuntu and Linux Mint. It is used to search, install, remove, and upgrade packages on the system. In addition, it can be used to clean up old packages and maintain the system at its optimal performance.

 

How to use the apt command ?

The basic syntax of the apt command is:

$ apt [options] [command] [package]
The available options for the apt command include:
  • -h, --help: Show the help message.
  • -v, --version: Show the version number.
  • -y, --yes: Assume yes on all queries.
  • -s, --simulate: Simulate the installation process.
  • -d, --download-only: Download the packages but don’t install them.

 

The available commands for the apt command include:
  • install: Install a package.
  • remove: Remove a package.
  • update: Update the package list.
  • upgrade: Upgrade installed packages.
  • dist-upgrade: Upgrade packages while also handling any dependencies.

 

 

Below are practical case studies of using the apt command

1. The ‘-y’ option is used to answer ‘yes’ to all prompts.

For example, to install the ‘nano’ package without any prompts:

$ apt -y install nano

 

2. The ‘-s’ option is used to simulate an installation without actually installing the package.

For example, to simulate the installation of the ‘nano’ package:

$ apt -s install nano

 

3. The ‘-f’ option is used to force the installation of a package.

For example, to force the installation of the ‘nano’ package:

$ apt -f install nano

 

4. The ‘-u’ option is used to list all packages that have updates available.

For example, to list all packages that have updates available:

$ apt -u upgrade

 

Examples of using apt command ?

1. For example, to install the “vim” package, we can use the following command:

$ sudo apt install vim

The command will download and install the latest version of the package. 

 

2. To remove the “vim” package, we can use the following command:

$ sudo apt remove vim

 

3. To update the list of available packages, we can use the following command:

$ sudo apt update

 

4. To upgrade all installed packages, we can use the following command:

$ sudo apt upgrade

 

5. To upgrade all installed packages and also handle any dependencies, we can use the following command:

$ sudo apt dist-upgrade

 

More examples of using Apt on Debian / Ubuntu / Mint / Kali 

The Apt command is pre-installed on Debian, Ubuntu, Mint, and Kali based distributions. It is used to manage packages on these distributions.

1. To search for a package, use the following command:

$ apt search [package_name]

For example, to search for the ‘nano’ package:

$ apt search nano

 

2. To install a package, use the following command:

$ apt install [package_name]

For example, to install the ‘nano’ package:

$ apt install nano

 

3. To upgrade a package, use the following command:

$ apt upgrade [package_name]

For example, to upgrade the ‘nano’ package:

$ apt upgrade nano

 

4. To remove a package, use the following command:

$ apt remove [package_name]

For example, to remove the ‘nano’ package:

$ apt remove nano

 

[Need help in fixing Linux system problems ? We can help you. ]

 



CONCLUSION

This article covers the apt command and its various options and commands. In fact, With the apt command, users can easily find and install software packages from the official repositories or from third-party sources such as PPAs (Personal Package Archives). It also helps users keep their system up to date by automatically downloading and installing the latest versions of packages.


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